Registered Charity Number: 1134890

Paul and Ruth Johnson working in Rwanda – follow their blog on the Equip Facebook page.

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Equip added 2 new photos.

When the latest Equip team head out to Kigali on Monday 23rd January it marks a significant milestone in the work of the charity. It was exactly ten years ago in January 2007 that Paul Johnson made his first visit to Rwanda and was moved to start the work that now supports two schools in the capital city of the country and has provided health care in refugee camps on the border.

A decade after Paul visited a school where there was nothing left to see but the graves of schoolchildren murdered in the horror of the 1994 genocide, his vision to educate a new generation of Rwandan young people has become a reality. This is thanks to your support and generosity.

Together we are making a difference. Thank you.
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Equip are delighted and extremely proud that all of the Class of 2016 at Kingdom Secondary and Vocational School have been accredited for their studies and and secured internships with employers in their chosen subjects which will help them obtain work for the future. We wish them well and will be tracking their progress over time.

We look forward to meeting and getting to know the Class of 2017 when we are in Kigali next week as the new academic year starts this month. For more see www.equipuk.org.
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Bananas are good for you! And from now on they are good for our Kingdom Secondary and Vocational School students too! In line with Equip's belief that everyone should ultimately be responsible for their own destiny, Equip funding has provided 1500 hundred banana tree seedlings. Planted on the school land late last year, the crops will create an income of over £10,000 a year, a business opportunity which will support our mission to enable the school to become self sufficient.

Thank you to our supporters for making this possible! You can donate regularly by visiting www.equipuk.org.
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Happy New Year! Our Facebook page may have been quiet for a while but we can assure you that we have been busy over the past few months with some exciting new projects in Rwanda taking shape. Team 2017 (eleven of us) head to Kigali from Heathrow next Monday 23rd January. More details to follow soon! ... See MoreSee Less

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Dear all our wonderful supporters. Thank you for all the views and likes and stuff. It means a lot.

We have taken a short break this summer just to get our heads around things but we will be back with you with our latest news very soon. Thank for all your donations. They are amazing. Lives are being transformed and we are feeling very good about it all.

The school year in Rwanda comes to an end next month and we have been equal to the challenge of meeting all our expenses. Next year, we want to do more and we continue to need your help. Please continue to follow with interest. More shortly. Thank you.
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Sandrine is a bright, bubbly Rwandan girl, always smiling, giggling and enjoying life.

This has not always been the case. Now 17 years old, her education was severely disrupted when she contracted typhoid as a child. She was so ill that she had to drop out of school and was unable to go back, even after she recovered as she had fallen so far behind. This gave her no prospects or future other than to farm the land as both her parents still do.

The fourth of six children, Sandrine then heard about Kingdom Secondary and Vocational School. Keen to take up a place on the hairdressing course, she and her family had to work hard to raise enough money to pay the transport to Kigali. She lives in a village in the furthest part of Rwanda from the capital and it takes a whole day to travel the distance. The cost of the transport was such that five others from her village who wanted to start the course with her, simply could not afford to get to the school. Although Sandrine was able to get to Kigali, she will not be able to afford to go home to see her family for the whole year.

Sandrine is now happily studying her chosen course which is fully paid for by Equip supporters and which will enable her to start her own business in the future. She also studies English, Religious Studies and IT. Watching her in lessons, we saw for ourselves how diligent a student she is and how much she has learned. The familiar smile breaks out across her pretty face when she is asked if the school has lived up to her expectations? It is "very wonderful" she says softly and tips her head back, continuing to smile.

Can you help fund a school place? Please visit our website to donate or click the donate button on our Facebook page. Just £15 a month will support a young person like Sandrine.
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Augustine's Story

Augustine is quiet, gentle and godly man who makes a big impact on you when you meet him. He is the Director of Studies at Equip's Kingdom Secondary and Vocational School. At a guess, he is probably about 70 years old and he has seen a lot of life. He smiles all the time and enjoys practising his English, always keen to engage visitors in conversation. Not surprising as he teaches English. I have watched some of his lessons and looked at his planning - both were superb. His energy in the classroom for an older colleague was amazing as he circulated among this pupils, supporting them in their work.

Rwandan by birth he fled his home country in the early 1980s. Much is remembered about the 1994 genocide but this is a country that has had generations of tension going back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. By the time of Rwanda's independence in 1962, tens of thousands of people, primarily Tutsis, had taken refuge in neighbouring states to escape the violence which had accompanied the gradual coming into power of the Hutu community.

A new cycle of ethnic conflict and violence continued after independence. Tutsi refugees in Tanzania and Zaire, seeking to regain their former positions in Rwanda, began organizing and staging attacks on Hutu targets and the Hutu government. Ten such attacks occurred between 1962 and 1967, each leading to retaliatory killings of large numbers of Tutsi civilians in Rwanda and creating new waves of refugees. By the end of the 1980s some 480,000 Rwandans had become refugees, primarily in Burundi, Uganda, Zaire and Tanzania. Augustine, then a young man, was one of them.

He describes himself as Manchester United fan, particularly he is keen to emphasise, in the Beckham era, and as we chat he reminisces about his own youthful sporting achievements in his near perfect English. He looks back nostalgically and it brings a twinkle to his eyes as he remembers the competitions he took part in and the trophies he won.

He returned to Rwanda in 2006, keen to come back and help rebuild his homeland after a quarter of a century living in Tanzania. Having spent many years as a Bible College lecturer, he now spends his days teaching the next generation of Rwandans. They both love and respect him.

Augustine earns just £100 a month. With that he has to feed his young family. His youngest children are just 12 and 8 years old and he has to pay for their education too. He lives close by to the school, in a typical rural Rwandan home. There is no running water in these houses and his food comes mainly from what can be grown.

Augustine is giving his older years to ensure our students have a God focused education which will enable them to determine their own futures. In his own words he says" I am grateful to be able to teach at the secondary school. Please ask if there is anyone else who can help us with this vision."

Can you give just £15 a month to help him?

Thank you
Ruth
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Meet Pacifique. He is 19 years old, friendly, popular and a great footballer. A Rwandan, he was brought up in the east of this beautiful country, close to the Tanzanian border. His parents are still subsistence farmers with seven children to feed. Pacifique is the second eldest in the family. He comes from a Christian family and his father plays the guitar in their local church.

When Pacifique heard about Kingdom Secondary and Vocational School in Kigali he desperately wanted the opportunity to learn new skills that would enable him to help support his family but so did many others from his village. His church leaders had the difficult job of choosing just one young person to take up a place at the school as there was no funding for any more. They needed to choose the person who would learn most effectively as who ever took up the place would need to teach others these skills when they returned to the village at the end of the year.

Pacifique was chosen as the best student to enrol on the construction course. He knows how privileged he is and is thrilled that he will now be able to help feed his six brothers and sisters as well as pass on his knowledge to others in his village.

With more funding, more young men and women could enrol - could you fund a place for just £15 a month? That's about 50p a day - less than a bottle of mineral water. Please visit our website to donate or click the donate button on our Facebook page.

Thank you.
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This school was wiped out in the unthinkable tragedy of 1994
… which caused these fantastic supporters to respond generously
… so we could buy this beautiful new land and build a new school
… for this amazing new generation of Rwandan young people
This school was wiped out in the unthinkable tragedy of 1994
… which caused these fantastic supporters to respond generously
… so we could buy this beautiful new land and build a new school
… for this amazing new generation of Rwandan young people

How we allocate funding


I pray that God will bless all the children in these schools and prosper all those who give to us by His mercy

Mama Eric


I am grateful for my place in the primary school and I am hoping, one day, to be president.

Rebecca


I am grateful for the land that has been provided. It provides food for our families and a school for our children. There is hope for our future.

Mussa


Thank you Equip. We have the chance to go to school and develop our education. We want to speak English and use the computer.

Daniel


I am an English teacher and I am grateful to be able to teach at the secondary school. Please ask if there is anyone else who can help us with this vision. They would be most welcome in Rwanda.

Augustine